What You Enter In CRM Directly Reflects on Your Ability to Do Your Job

Originally posted on Getting Past Yes:

When entering notes and history into CRM systems I am an advocate of what I call the “bus” theory.  If the salesperson working the account was hit by a bus on the way to work the next person to work the account should have all of the information necessary to close the deal.

Information that I feel is crucial is:

  • Does the contact have budget approval?
  • Who are the other stakeholders in the process?
  • Is the sale tied to a project if so what is the go live date?
  • What do the company financials look like?
  • What competitors are in the bidding process?
  • What are the next steps – a meeting or scheduled call?
  • What are the prospect’s concerns and objections?

Other helpful information could be:

  • The gatekeeper’s name.
  • Facts that were discovered during bonding and rapport – hobbies or interests.
  • Links to the prospect’s LinkedIN profile or Twitter account.

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Sales Tips for Successful Trade Shows

Originally posted on Getting Past Yes:

In a lot of cases companies will send junior sales people to trade shows. Over the years I have seen these babes in the woods make many rookie mistakes. While it is essential for new sales people to get live prospect exposure, it is also important for them to have superb mentoring. Make sure your trade show booth is staffed with the right mixture of your top sales people and your hottest new comers. Tradeshows are not cheap and squeezing an ROI out of a show seems to be getting harder year after year. This makes it that much more important to seize every opportunity that is presented to you on the road. Here are some rookie mistakes I have seen time and again on the floors of tradeshow.

Get out of the booth: Nothing irritates me more than seeing 2 or 3 people sitting in a booth all staring…

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